Special Topic Courses

ANTH 105: Archaeology & World Prehistory (3) This course introduces students to the field of archaeology and traces the many paths of cultural evolution as reconstructed from the archaeological record. [GE.]

ANTH 306: Ancient Mediterranean Cultures (3) This course will survey the cultures of the Mediterranean Region and the evolution of these cultures through the emergence of States in the region.

ANTH 353: Archaeology of Warfare (4) This course will explore the origins/causes/consequences of warfare. We will gain an understanding of the range of variation in which warfare and human societies have influenced one another.

ANTH 390: Chinese Cultural Heritage (4) In this study of Chinese cultural heritage from historical, political and institutional perspectives, we examine ancient and classical works, folklore, traditional drama and poetry, kinship, ritual studies and literature.

ART 302: Buddhist Art and Materiality (3) Learn the history of Buddhist art, architecture, iconography, and material culture of East Asia, as a means of deep spiritual expression and the quest for enlightenment in this introductory survey course.

ART 302: Arts of Japan (3) A survey course on Japanese art history from prehistoric times through the modern era, including paintings, sculptures, architecture, ceramics, woodblock prints and more, of Shinto, Buddhist, Yamato-e, Shogunal, literati, and ukiyo-e expression.

ART 302: Ceramics of East Asia (3) A survey course that will consider the cultural, historical, religious, political, technological, and artistic importance, as well as the trade and transmission of ideas, in regards to the ceramics of East Asia.

BIOL 685: Biology of the Chiroptera (1) Through selected readings and student presentations, this seminar will explore the natural history, ecology, community and social behavior of bats, and their specialized adaptations, for example physiological torpor and echolocation.

BIOL 685: All About CRISPRs (1) This primary literature-based seminar will explore the relatively brief history of CRISPRs and their meteoric rise to popularity for genome engineering in microbes, animals, plants, and human tissues.

ENGL 336: Multicultural Queer Narratives (4) Fiction, memoir, poetry, film and performances that subvert conventions of sexuality, identity and narrative. Baldwin, Lorde, Moraga, West, Chrystos, Alexie, Trujillo, Linmark, Hernández, Dunye, Hardy, Feinberg and the film Moonlight.

ENGL 350: Sexology and Literary Scandal (4) Obscenity trials, literary depictions of sexuality, science writing on sex and gender, the eugenics movement in late-Victorian and early-twentieth-century Britain and their relevance today. Oscar Wilde, D. H. Lawrence, Radclyffe Hall, Dorothy Roberts.

ESM 480: Contemporary River Ecosystem Management Issues (1). Weekly seminars with assigned readings that address contemporary river ecosystem management issues including: Mekong River upstream fish passage; annual hydrograph variability in the mainstem Klamath River; and critical review of CDFW’s instream flow study for Big Sur River.

ESM 580: Contemporary River Ecosystem Management Issues (2). Weekly seminars with assigned readings that address contemporary river ecosystem management issues including: Mekong River upstream fish passage; annual hydrograph variability in the mainstem Klamath River; and critical review of CDFW’s instream flow study for Big Sur River. Guided research and writing of technical memorandums for three management issues.

ENST 123: Green Building (1) This course is intended to create a foundation that enables the student to successfully exercise and potentially adopt natural patterns of building and construction. In addition, students will explore alternative methods of sustainable residential design. Each student will build and work with natural materials (including, but not limited to – cob, super adobe, natural paint, and hempcrete), gain a working knowledge of what constitutes Net Zero Energy housing and explore how to build it. This course includes field trip opportunities.

ENST 123: Urban Homesteading (1) This course will explore various components of an urban homesteading system that can be implemented in many situations. It will provide a hands-on approach in which students will have the opportunity to hone and develop skills in self-sufficient living for a city or suburban environment.

ENST 123: Eco-craft, Introduction to Herbs (1) This course is designed to provide a brief introduction to herbalism and various ways medicinal plants are used by healers. Students will learn about some of the most commonly used herbs and how people have incorporated them into daily life for overall health and well-being. Each class will include hands-on herbal preparation making including various methods, tips, and techniques.

ENST 123: Foundations of Organic Gardening (1) This course is intended to create a foundation that enables each student to successfully plan, plant, and harvest an organic garden of their own. Once the basic skills are acquired, growing our own food is one of the most empowering things we can do. It is simultaneously a way to save money, eat healthy, create community and live sustainably.

ES 280: Act to End Racism (3) Engaging with issues regarding race and racism is critical in the fight for social justice. This course explores the work of dismantling racism. While we examine grassroots activism, social movements, and other strategies to combat racism, the course focuses on individual transformation and personal pathways to act to end racism.

ES 305:  African American Cultural History (3) Drawing on films, cultural studies, and historical research, the course crafts a new synthesis that challenges our understandings of the past and offers new insights through the lens of many narratives and through the perspectives of people who lived through triumphs and struggle that have shaped the African diaspora.

ES 480: Campus Dialogue on Race (1) Dynamic speakers, workshops, exhibits and screenings that relate to racial justice, civil rights, democracy, intersectional analysis, and strategies for change. CR/NC.

ES 336: Multicultural Queer Narratives (4) Fiction, memoir, poetry, film and performances that subvert conventions of sexuality, identity and narrative. Baldwin, Lorde, Moraga, West, Chrystos, Alexie, Trujillo, Linmark, Hernández, Dunye, Hardy, Feinberg and the film Moonlight.

FILM 477: Environmental Sustainability Video Production (4) Work as a production team to develop, film, edit and deliver 2 short films aimed at increasing transportation sustainability at HSU. This partnership with the Office of Sustainability provides professional experience while exploring the use of narrative and documentary films as mediums for social change.

FREN 340: Translating Culture (3) In this course, students will work with the instructor to translate a book that explores the meanings of masks in Mali and Burkina Faso, two Francophone countries in West Africa.  The French translation will be published through Humboldt State University Press.

FREN 390: Islam in France Today (1) In a context of overwhelming demonization of Muslims in the world, we will watch and discuss three films that challenge the way Islam is re-presented in the media.

GEOG 471: Data Visualization (1) This course will explore techniques for creating quick, web-based, professional-looking maps for publication or research. Covers a variety of tools and concepts for synthesizing complex data and creating basic maps for data visualization.

GEOG 472: American West (3) This course examines issues of land use, water rights, infrastructure projects, environmentalism and other contemporary issues in the American West.

GEOG 472M: American West Depth Experience (1) Regional geography field exploration in northern California and Oregon

HIST 180: Islamic Societies (3) An introduction to the history of Islamic societies, this course explores key historical events, social and political turning points, and intellectual transformations that have shaped the Middle East and Islam.

HIST 393: Gender and Sexuality in East Asian History (4) This course examines topics such as gender roles, marriage and family life, masculinity and femininity, and sexuality in the context of Chinese, Japanese and Korean history from ancient times through the modern age.

HIST 393: Three Revolutions: Haiti, Mexico, Cuba (4) Comparative examination of three revolutions in Latin America. Focus on causes, course, consequences, and legacies.

HIST 393: Middle East Revolutions (4) The recent uprisings in the Middle East have deep historical roots in protest movements in region. Historically situating expressions of popular discontent and uprisings, and examining how demands were understood, articulated and communicated, this course will explore the history of dissent movements in the Ottoman Empire, Egypt, and Iran from the 19th century to the present.

JMC 480: Environmental Reporting (3) Environmental Reporting offers students a chance to discover, report, verify, and communicate the scientifically grounded stories of our planet's ecology. Students will experiment with a variety of tools – including infographics, social networking, blogging, podcasts and videos – to communicate important truths about the state of our natural and human constructed environments.

LSEE 380: Foundations of Teaching (3) An introduction to education, the study of philosophical, theoretical, social and historical educational foundations and the role of education in democratic societies. Taken with LSEE 380L.

LSEE 380L: Foundations of Teaching Practicum (1) Structured ongoing observations in local elementary schools

LSEE 380:  Math for Elementary Teachers (3) A course designed to build a solid foundation for elementary school teaching focusing on the complementary development of symbol sense (algebra), spatial  (geometry) and data sense (probability and statistics).

LSEE 380L: Math for Elementary Teachers (1) Structured activities in local elementary schools.

LSEE 380: Number Sense and Operations for Elementary Math (3) A course designed to improve facility with, appreciation of, and understanding of mathematics to build a solid foundation for elementary school teaching with a focus on number sense.

LSEE 380L: Number Sense and Operations for Elementary Math (1) Structured activities in local elementary schools.

MUS 180: Beginning Jazz Improvisation (1) An introduction to jazz improvisation for instrumentalists and vocalists.

PHIL 100: Logic (3) Study of correct reasoning. Sentential logic, informal fallacies, and certain paradigms of inductive reasoning. Nature of language, artificial and natural. [GE.]

PHIL 301: Reflection on the Arts (3) Theories of art as they emphasize or suppress one or more dimensions of artistic creation and aesthetic experience:  form, feeling, realism, fantasy. Judgments of taste, style, and excellence. [GE.]

PHIL 304: Philosophy of Sex & Love (3) Analysis of metaphysical and moral issues relating to sex and love, such as: What is love? What sexual activities are natural, moral, perversions? Friendship, adultery, pornography, prostitution, homosexuality, and same-sex marriage. [GE.]

PHIL 355: Existentialism (3) Principal existential philosophers of 19th and 20th centuries, such as Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Nietzsche, Sartre, Marcel, Buber.

PSCI 330: Conflict in Divided Societies (4) This course will comparatively examine three formative conflicts in the twentieth century: Palestine/Israel, North Ireland, and South Africa. We will consider the dynamics of settler colonialism as both a historical process operating on a global scale and a social encounter experienced in diverse local contexts.

RS 393 California's Religious Diversity (3) Religious literacy gives leaders a competitive advantage and builds civil society and democratic participation. This course will explore the impact of California’s diverse religious identities on politics, ethics, and culture. Topics include religious freedom, immigration, hybridity, and women in leadership.

SOC 480: Migration & the Global Economy (4) This course explores human movement within the context of the global economy.  We will explore the political and economic underpinnings of mass migration and raise questions about international human rights, the privileging of profit, and the criminalization of mobility. (CJS Majors Knowledge Area: Justice and Policy. SOC Knowledge Area: Inequalities and Change)

SOC 480: No More Hate! Bias Prevention (2) This class will explore the structural, interpersonal and personal forms, causes and effects of bias (including micro-aggressions and focus on developing intervention and prevention strategies. This course will provide practical tools as well as a baseline understanding of the causes of bias/hate actions.

SPAN 280: Spanish Retreat Seminar (1) Restricted seminar for Spanish Heritage speakers; preference given to SPAN 108S students.  Meets one weekend off-campus.  Cultural heritage trip to San Francisco using only Spanish for communication.  Contact instructor for permission number. CR/NC.

SPAN 280: Latin American Protest Songs and Social Change (1) Learn about the rich history of Latin American protest songs within the historical frame in which they appear. Protest songs as current and relevant practice for social justice. Sing along most popular songs guided by master singer Isabel Lipthay from Chile and Germany.

SPAN 480: Hispanic Women and Culture (4) Hispanic women’s perspectives and contributions to painting, human rights, politics, photography, migration, travel and literature from the XVI to XXI centuries. Seminar includes women’s voices from Latin America, Spain and USA.  [Prereq: SPAN 340 or IA]

SPAN 480: Capstone Service Learning Experience (1) Course associated with SPAN 492. Students work with various local organizations and the Hispanic community. Valuable opportunities to apply and reflect on learning as well as work with the technical and social complexities of providing services to the community.

WS 336: Multicultural Queer Narratives (4) Fiction, memoir, poetry, film & performances that subvert conventions of sexuality, identity and narrative. Baldwin, Lorde, Moraga, West, Chrystos, Alexie, Trujillo, Linmark, Hernández, Dunye, Hardy, Feinberg and the film Moonlight.

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