Special Topic Courses

ANTH 306: Vikings:  Myths & Legends (3) This course looks at the Vikings of legend as they were a thousand years ago and their influence on today’s culture and media. We will examine the material evidence scattered throughout Europe and the Mid-East during the Viking Age and explore how they have infiltrated our modern society through film, books and television.

ANTH 329: Latin American Indigenous Movements (4) This course gives an overview of Latin American indigenous movements and reflects on their recent approaches to rights discourses in the face of legal and extrajudicial forms of state violence.

ANTH 390: Exploring the Celtic Realms (4) This course will examine the history, religion, and culture of the Celtic peoples of Europe with an emphasis on pre-Christian religion and the conversion of Ireland, Wales, and Scotland.

ART 302: 20th & 21st Century Asian Art (3) Modern and Contemporary Art of China, Korea, and Japan, addressing the confrontations between modernity and tradition, state and self, the colonizer and the colonized, and collecting and the market.

ART 302: Pictures of the Floating World (3) Paintings and woodblock prints, courtesans, actors, and places to be, this class focuses on the elite, literati and popular artistic cultures of Edo period Japan.

ART 372: 4D Video + Animation (3) Introduction to the aesthetics and histories of time-based art in the form of moving images and audio. Instruction and practice in use of Adobe Premiere Pro and hands on production processes.

ART 480: Alternative Material and Practices (3) A study of alternative material and processes. Projects will range from inflatable objects, wearable art, installation, and performance art. Materials will vary depending on student concept of personal work. 

BIOL 685: Marine Science Integration (1) Topics on science integration that links ecosystems and disciplines, while engaging diverse agencies toward science-based management using the North Coast Marine Protected Areas network as a case study.

BIOL 685: Molecular Mechanisms of Development (1) Seminar will focus on the molecular pathways involved in organismal development, experiments performed by scientists interested in understanding these questions, and the experimental systems that they have utilized.

CS 480: Data Mining (3) Discover how to use machine learning and statistical methods to reveal structure and patterns in data sets.  Lectures each week are accompanied by labs where the techniques are employed on data sets.

CS 480:  Mobile Apps (3) This course provides a survey of mobile application development using the Android platform.  Topic include accessibility, user interface design, web services, and game development.

ENGL 336: Asian American Literatures (4) Poetry, fiction, memoir, graphic novel, and spoken word, including Island, No No Boy, Dogeaters, Sông I Sing, Dirty River, American Born Chinese.  The US has used racist laws to distinguish between “Asian” and “American”; Asian American cultures emerge anyway, offering alternative sites for reading the nation.

ENGL 342: Shakespeare in Performance (4) This course will study a number of Shakespeare’s plays as scripts for theatrical and cinematic performance. In order to more fully explore the relationship between text and performance, we will learn about early modern staging practices as well as modern approaches to staging early modern plays; we will also watch and analyze scenes from film and stage productions of assigned plays.

ENGL 360: Queer Women’s Memoir (4) This course examines immigrant and working-class women’s narratives, graphic memoir, and collected essays and interviews by queer activists of color. Read Daisy Hernández, Jeanette Winterson, Dorothy Allison, Cristy C. Road, and Barbara Smith. Our foci will be self-representation and narrative form, intersectional identities, and activist histories.

ENGL 465B: Reading and Writing the Borderlands (4) Read Gloria Anzaldúa’s groundbreaking Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza alongside Imaniman: Poets Writing in the Anzaldúan Borderlands. These diverse writers interrogate, complicate, and personalize the borderlands in transgressive and transformative ways, opening new paths for the next generation of spiritual, political and cultural border-crossers.

ENGL 560: Queer Women’s Memoir (4) This course examines immigrant and working-class women’s narratives, graphic memoir, and collected essays and interviews by queer activists of color. Read Daisy Hernández, Jeanette Winterson, Dorothy Allison, Cristy C. Road, and Barbara Smith. Our foci will be self-representation and narrative form, intersectional identities, and activist histories.

ENGR 480: Race to Zero Competition (1) A student design competition to develop a net-zero-energy building design, based on competition rules for the U.S. Department of Energy’s “Race to Zero” contest.

ENGR 480: MidPac Competition (1) A student design competition to develop a water treatment system based on competition rules for the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Mid-Pacific design contest.

ENGR 481: Design of Drinking Water Unit Processes (3) Unit processes for drinking water treatment: physico-chemical processes (screening, sedimentation, filtration, colloid destabilization, disinfection), reactor kinetics, applications to the design of specific water treatment operations.  [Prereq: ENGR 351;  ENGR 416.]

ENGR 481: Distributed Renewable Electricity Systems (3) Introduction to foundations and topics in the design and operation of electric power systems (the “grid”), integrating renewable electricity generation into the grid, and distributed energy systems that combine generation, storage, and demand-side management.  [Prereq: ENGR 322, ENGR 331, ENGR 333, ENGR 326 (C), and PHYX 315 (C).]

ENST 123: Eco-craft, Introduction to Herbs (1) This course is designed to provide a brief introduction to herbalism and various ways medicinal plants are used by healers. Students will learn about some of the most commonly used herbs and how people have incorporated them into daily life for overall health and well-being. Each class will include hands-on herbal preparation making including various methods, tips, and techniques.

ENST 123: Foundations of Organic Gardening (1) This course is intended to create a foundation that enables each student to successfully plan, plant, and harvest an organic garden of their own. Once the basic skills are acquired, growing our own food is one of the most empowering things we can do. It is simultaneously a way to save money, eat healthy, create community and live sustainably.

ENST 123: Green Building  (1) This course is intended to create a foundation that enables the student to successfully exercise and potentially adopt natural patterns of building and construction. In addition, students will explore alternative methods of sustainable residential design. Each student will build and work with natural materials (including, but not limited to – cob, super adobe, natural paint, and hempcrete), gain a working knowledge of what constitutes Net Zero Energy housing and explore how to build it. This course includes field trip opportunities.

ENST 123: Urban Homesteading (1) This course will explore various components of an urban homesteading system that can be implemented in many situations. It will provide a hands-on approach in which students will have the opportunity to hone and develop skills in self-sufficient living for a city or suburban environment.

ES 306: Narrating Genocide (3) Explores various genocides of the modern era, with particular emphasis on the Armenian Genocide (1915-1923). Examines the processes of genocide, collective responsibility and responses from the international community.

ES 336: Asian American Literatures (4) Poetry, fiction, memoir, graphic novel, and spoken word, including Island, No No Boy, Dogeaters, Sông I Sing, Dirty River, American Born Chinese.  The U.S. has used racist laws to distinguish between “Asian” and “American”; Asian American cultures emerge anyway, offering alternative sites for reading the nation.

ES 465B:  Reading and Writing the Borderlands (4) Read Gloria Anzaldúa’s groundbreaking Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza alongside Imaniman: Poets Writing in the Anzaldúan Borderlands. These diverse writers interrogate, complicate, and personalize the borderlands in transgressive and transformative ways, opening new paths for the next generation of spiritual, political and cultural border-crossers.

ES 480: Latin American Indigenous Movements (4) This course gives an overview of Latin American indigenous movements and reflects on their recent approaches to rights discourses in the face of legal and extrajudicial forms of state violence.

ES 480: Social Justice Summit (1) Attend HSU’s annual Social Justice Summit. Organized by the Multicultural Center, there will be a keynote presentation, workshops, film screenings, and discussions. Topics may include art and activism, transformative reforms, social justice movements: past present and future, and more.

FILM 380: Cut! The Art and Craft of Editing (1) An introduction to video editing, students will learn the technical and creative considerations of efficient and effective editing using Premiere Pro, including project set up, organization inside the program and how to take a project from raw footage to a compelling exported video. [This two-day course will meet on Saturday, Feb. 3 and Sunday, Feb. 4.]

FILM 380: The Visual World: Digital Storytelling (3) A comprehensive introduction to filmmaking, The Visual World: Digital Storytelling explores the technical and creative aspects of film language, cinematography and editing. How human physiology and psychology are utilized to hook a viewer is explored. Students will use video cameras and editing software to create compelling short films.

FISH 480/480L: Advanced Aquaculture (2/1) Biology of fish reproduction, spawning techniques, egg incubation, and larval rearing.  [Prereq: FISH 370 or FISH 375 or IA, Weekly: 2 hrs lect, 2 hrs lab.  Lab must be taken concurrently with lecture.]

FISH 480/480L: Fisheries Ecological Modeling (2/1) How individual fish growth and behavior can be used to study population, and ecosystem, responses to disturbance. [Prereq: STAT 333 or IA, Weekly: 2 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab.  Lab must be taken concurrently with lecture.]

FISH 580/580L: Fisheries Ecological Modeling (2/1) How individual fish growth and behavior can be used to study population, and ecosystem, responses to disturbance. [Prereq: STAT 333 or IA, Weekly: 2 hrs lect, 3 hrs lab.  Lab must be taken concurrently with lecture.]

FREN 314:  Border-crossing (4) This class explores various forms of border-crossing (politics, race, class, economics, law, geography, etc.) as a strategy to challenge systemic injustice in France and to further the ideals of the French Revolution. 

FREN 341: Current Events, Identity, and Art in the Francophone World (2) We will explore personal, national, and international identities, and corresponding artistic political and self-expression. Events from across the French-speaking world will be connected to today’s global conversations. Course taught in French.

FREN 480: Love, War, and the Unknown in Francophone Cinema (3) By studying films from throughout the French-speaking world, we will explore cultural norms via the themes of love, war and the unknown, showing films from early to contemporary cinema. Course taught in English. Open to all students.

GERM 480: International Dialog through Germanic Films (1) This seminar presents and discusses films from German-speaking regions and countries.  Course discussion is conducted in English, and the films have English subtitles.  [CR/NC.]

MATH 480: Preparation for Industrial Careers in Math (3) The course gives students a practical experience constructing and analyzing mathematical, statistical and computational models for problems from industry, government or business. Students will work in groups on a challenging and engaging research project. The final product in the course is a written and an oral final report to outline the problem, its significance, the solution approaches and the proposed solutions.  The course will also have a career-advising component developed and taught in collaboration with the HSU Academic and Career Advising Center. This portion of the course will help prepare students to seek employment outside of an academic setting.

PSCI 371: WPSA Conference (1) Attend the Western Political Science Association meeting, held in San Francisco, March 29-31. Learn from research presentations by hundreds of political scientists on a wide range of political topics. Appropriate for advanced students seriously considering an academic career. Must attend campus planning meetings prior to the conference. [Open to advanced students with IA.]

SOC 480: Aging: Inequality & Public Policy (1) This course will discuss past & present successful models for providing seniors with quality care, dignity, and self-determination; cover an overview of economic, social, legal, political, and historical aspects of an aging society; and examine relationships between inequality and aging through the creation of dependency and disenfranchisement of America’s older adults. (CJS and SOC majors check with your advisor to see how this unit will fit into your academic plan.)

SOC 480: Bodies & Society: Fat Studies (1) Exploring issues of body and embodiment in society. Focus on the study of fat in history, in the media, as a social movement and as part of intersecting identities. (CJS and SOC majors check with your advisor to see how this unit will fit into your academic plan.)

TA 480: Clowning for Actors (1) A course that explores the unpredictable, ridiculous, and dynamic art of clowning. Students will create clown characters and original material, apply clowning-based principles to their acting, and examine the cultural significance of the clown figure.

TA 480: Luscious Color (1) What is your favorite color?  It is big wide world of color.  This course will be an exploration of where colors came from, how they are used, classified and described.  How we manipulate color to communicate with others and how others manipulate us with color.  The point of view will be from the perspective of the fine and performing arts.

WLDF 480/480L: Human-Wildlife Conflict (2/1) This course draws upon multifaceted issues associated with human-wildlife conflicts and best practices for addressing these complex conservation challenges to cultivate sustainable conservation solutions. [Prereq: WLDF 311 or IA; Lab must be taken concurrently with lecture.]

WS 465B: Reading and Writing the Borderlands (4) Read Gloria Anzaldúa’s groundbreaking Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza alongside Imaniman: Poets Writing in the Anzaldúan Borderlands. These diverse writers interrogate, complicate, and personalize the borderlands in transgressive and transformative ways, opening new paths for the next generation of spiritual, political and cultural border-crossers.

WS 480: Attend Take Back the Night (1) TBTN is a series of events calling attention to sexualized violence while working to end it.  This one-unit course provides a unique opportunity to earn credit for attending TBTN events and participating in four class meetings, aimed at deepening our understanding of men’s violence against women and what we can do to end all forms of violence.

WS 480: Latin American Indigenous Movements (4) This course gives an overview of Latin American indigenous movements and reflects on their recent approaches to rights discourses in the face of legal and extrajudicial forms of state violence.

WS 480: Social Justice Summit (1) Attend HSU’s annual Social Justice Summit. Organized by the Multicultural Center, there will be a keynote presentation, workshops, film screenings, and discussions. Topics may include art and activism, transformative reforms, social justice movements: past present and future, and more.

WS 480: Volunteer for Take Back the Night (1) Exciting opportunity for collaborative, hands on volunteer work during the organizing process of TBTN.  TBTN is a series of events calling attention to sexualized and other forms of violence against women, while simultaneously working to end violence in all its forms.

IA = Instructor Approval

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